Second Degree Assault in Maryland

In Maryland, second degree assault includes three types: intent to frighten, attempted battery, and battery. Intent to frighten must be proven beyond a reasonable doubt by proving that the defendant had both the intent and the ability to place the victim in fear of physical harm or offensive contact, and that the victim reasonably feared…

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Blasi v. State – Traffic Stops in Maryland

Although the Court of Appeals decided the driver was not driving unsafely prior to the traffic stop in Rowe v. State, leading to a reversal of an evidence suppression denial made during trial, the same was not decided in Blasi v. State. In Blasi, the driver was stopped for substantially crossing the right shoulder line…

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Rowe v. State – Traffic Stops in Maryland

Rowe v. State is a case in which a driver was stopped for briefly crossing the right shoulder line twice on suspicion of driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs. After being pulled over, the officer determined that alcohol was not a factor, but did find that the vehicle was a rental vehicle and…

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Violation of Peace Order in Maryland

Like with protective orders, it is easy to accidentally violate the terms of a peace order since they can also be quite broad. If you have violated a peace order, you may be arrested and face a misdemeanor charge that carries a maximum of 90 days in prison and/or fine of $1000 for the first…

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Peace Orders in Maryland

In Maryland, a peace order protects those who do not qualify for a protective order, but provides abused parties with similar protection to that of a protective order (click here for more about protective orders). The following relationship types may qualify for a peace order: non-cohabitant significant others (without child in common), co-workers, strangers, acquaintances,…

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